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1955 Topps # 16 Roy Sievers (Senators)


Book   = $ *BOOK*
Price = $ 17.50
EX/MINT

1955 Topps # 16 Roy Sievers (Senators) Baseball cards value
Price = $ 17.50
         

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Below are short bits & pieces on sportscard & baseball trading card collecting.
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Baseball

vintage baseball wirephotos UPI/AP

Vintage Baseball Wire Photos

vintage baseball wirephotos UPI/AP

UPI/AP Wirephotos

wirephotos vintage machine UPI/AP
Official authentic vintage UPI/AP Wirephotos/Laserphotos are very limited, normally only 1 sent to subscribing newspapers. Photos were black & white printed on electro-static printers, usually sent in 3 stages, Cyan, Magenta & Yellow, then combined into a color photograph. Photos are work products and VG to NEAR MINT. As a bonus, some have editor's blue-line cropping marks.

Scarce, interesting and snapshots of history, wire photos of major subjects and moments make for great collectibles. Wirephotos and laserphotos are no longer transmitted in this manner (stopping around the early 90's). Images are now transmitted from computer to computer with no need for hardcopies.
old UPI wirephotos old AP wirephotos Wirephotos images taken with low res camera so images do not do then justice. The wirephotos are nicer than in the image. Most wirephotos from San Diego Union Tribune archives and make nice additions to your collection.

Click for a complete listing and images of our UPI/AP Sports Wirephotos.
Baseball

1962 Topps Football Bucks

The 1962 Topps Football Bucks resembled U.S. currency and measured 1 1/4" x 4 1/4". But ... instead of Abe Lincoln staring at you, it could be Fran Tarkenton !!!

Drawings of the player's home parks along with brief write-ups appeared on the front. The backs included team and league logos. Printing was done with black and green ink on off-white (very thin) paper stock. Bucks are typically found with a fold crease in the middle as they were inserted in packs in that manner.

The 1962 Topps Bucks were inserts in wax packs of the 1962 Topps regular issue football cards. Player selection was super and the featured ROOKIES of Fran Tarkenton and Mike Ditka !!! Also numerous other Hall-of-Famers including JIM BROWN, BART STARR, Y.A. Tittle, Johnny Unitas, Lou Groza and other greats !!!


Baseball

1970/1972/1973 Topps Candy Lids
Checklist & Values


1973 Topps Candy Lids Box 1973 Topps Candy Lids Tub Topps has tried many crazy products, called "test issues". Mostly distributed in limited areas, test issues were scarce. "Candy Lids" were little tubs of candy with player's photos on bottom of a 1-7/8" lid. 10 cents/tub, 24 tubs/box.

Topps first Candy Lids in 1970 and they are very, very hard to find. They had small photos of Tom Seaver, Carl Yastrzemski & Frank Howard.

1970 Topps Candy Lids Front 1970 Topps Candy Lids Back 1972 Topps Candy Lids Ryan 1970 Topps Candy Lids were called "Baseball Stars Bubble Gum", had 24 players, the 1973 Topps Candy Lids had 55.

Topps planned 1972 Candy Lids but never released it, a few proofs do exist.

1973 Topps Comics Topps 1973 Pinups & Comics share many of the same photos.

Click for complete 1973 Topps Candy Lids Checklist/Prices
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Baseball
Tobacco Cards

Starting approximately in 1886, sportscards, mostly baseball cards, were often included with tobacco products, for promotional purposes and also because the card reinforced the packaging and protected cigarettes from damage. These sports cards are referred to as tobacco cards in the baseball card hobby. Over the next few years many different companies produced baseball cards. Tobacco cards soon started to disappear as the American Tobacco Company tried to develop a monopoly by buying out other companies.

They were reintroduced in the 1900s, as American Tobacco came under pressure from antitrust action and Turkish competition. The most famous and most expensive, baseball card is the rare T206 Honus Wagner. The card exists in very limited quantities compared to others of its type because Wagner forced the card to be removed from printing. It is widely (and incorrectly) believed that Wagner did so because he refused to promote tobacco, but the true explanation lies in a dispute over compensation.

Soon other companies also began producing baseball and football cards. Sports magazines such as The Sporting News were early entries to the market. Candy manufacturers soon joined the fray and reflected a shift toward a younger target audience for cards. Caramel companies were particularly active and baseball cards were one of the first prizes to be included in Cracker Jacks. World War I soon suppressed baseball card production.

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