FREE Free Baseball Cards (10) NM/MINT
Vintage Hall-of-Famers
click for details
Free Baseball Cards FREE

Click to goto:

Baseball-Cards.com

Autographed Gateway cachets

USE BACK ARROW TO RETURN TO PRIOR PAGE

1975 Topps #194 '1956 MVPs' - Mickey Mantle/Don Newcombe (Yankees/Dodgers)
Baseball card


Price = $ 17.50
NM/MINT

1975 Topps #194 '1956 MVPs' - Mickey Mantle/Don Newcombe (Yankees/Dodgers) Baseball cards value
         

pointer Vintage Baseball cards
Select a different Sport or Vintage Baseball Cards set

or Find:
Enter words, partial words or phrases
1959 Topps    displays vintage 1959 Topps Baseball sports cards.
Bowman Mickey Mantle     displays all Bowman Mickey Mantle sports cards.
Below are tidbits on sportscard & baseball bubble gum trading card collecting.
I invite you to wander around the website for more info, prices, values & images
on vintage baseball, football, basketball, hockey, sport and non-sports card info.
Baseball

1961 Nu-Card Baseball Scoops

80-card set of regular sized cards Issued by Nu-Card, Inc., followed on the footsteps of their over-sized 1960 issue. The cards again featured newspaper style baseball highlights ('Scoops'). Printed in red and black, the card fronts resemble a newspaper's front page headline story with photo with the "news article" on the back. The cards showcase some of the baseball's most interesting highlights in it's first 100 years. The 80 card 1961 Nu card Scoops set is numbered from 401-480.

Click for complete 1961 Nu-Card Baseball Scoops checklist and prices
Note: You may be on that page right now.
Click for complete 1960 Nu-Card Baseball Scoops checklist and prices


Baseball

1957 Topps Football Cards
Checklist & Values


In 1957 Topps created the modern day card by reducing the size of cards to current standard 2-1/2 x 3-1/2 inches. Topps also increased the set to 154 players and dramatically changed card format to a horizontal split-card. Player selection was awesome with (31) future Hall-of-Famers. 1957's top rookies were Bart Starr, Johnny Unitas & Paul Hornung. The only variation is card #58 Willard Sherman.
Click for complete 1957 Topps Football card values and prices
Note: You may be on that page right now.
Baseball

Team Autographed / Signed Baseballs


Team signed baseballs were the thing well before single-signed balls exploded on the market.
What is a "Team Signed Baseball" ???
Simple answer: A ball with XXX signatures of a certain team for a certain year. What is difficult is the XXX. Baseball tons of roster moves make it nearly impossible to "Get Them All".

Generally, team signed baseballs from early 1900's had 10 to 15 signatures, the 1940's that jumped to 18 to 25. Joyce Sports Research Collection (Notre Dame) says "signatures must include only members of a specific team from a specific year, and there must be some approximation of completeness."

Not concrete but to me a "team ball" MUST have ALL the team's STARS (unless a rookie or in season trade) and in today's market at least 20, preferably more, and the manager.

Determining Age of Team Signed Balls
"Official" league balls have stamped signatures of current league presidents on the "sweet spot". Starting 1934/1935 balls were produced by Spalding (NL) and Reach (AL). Rawlings took over in 1977/78. Have a possible team roster at hand, ESPN & baseball-reference.com have great sites), decipher a few signatures then solve the puzzle.

Click for our current Autographed/Signed Team Baseball inventory
Note: You may be on that page now.
Baseball
Tobacco Cards

Starting approximately in 1886, sportscards, mostly baseball cards, were often included with tobacco products, for promotional purposes and also because the card reinforced the packaging and protected cigarettes from damage. These sports cards are referred to as tobacco cards in the baseball card hobby. Over the next few years many different companies produced baseball cards. Tobacco cards soon started to disappear as the American Tobacco Company tried to develop a monopoly by buying out other companies.

They were reintroduced in the 1900s, as American Tobacco came under pressure from antitrust action and Turkish competition. The most famous and most expensive, baseball card is the rare T206 Honus Wagner. The card exists in very limited quantities compared to others of its type because Wagner forced the card to be removed from printing. It is widely (and incorrectly) believed that Wagner did so because he refused to promote tobacco, but the true explanation lies in a dispute over compensation.

Soon other companies also began producing baseball and football cards. Sports magazines such as The Sporting News were early entries to the market. Candy manufacturers soon joined the fray and reflected a shift toward a younger target audience for cards. Caramel companies were particularly active and baseball cards were one of the first prizes to be included in Cracker Jacks. World War I soon suppressed baseball card production.

© 1995-2019 "InterNet's Baseball Card Store" / Joseph Juhasz ... All Rights Reserved