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1963 Topps Flags Midgee #19 Cuba n card

Price = $ 11.95
NEAR MINT



1963 Topps Flags Midgee #19 Cuba n cards value
         

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Below are some tidbits on baseball and sportscard collecting. Visit our web site for more info on vintage and current baseball, football, basketball, hockey, sports and non-sport cards and card collecting.
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Q3: Are sports cards valuable ?

Like all collectibles, some sports cards increase in value and a few can become very valuable. Determining a card's value is based on a number of factors including the popularity of the player, the card's scarcity, it's condition, and demand among collectors. A card can be scarce but if there's no demand for it, it's value may not be to great.

Q: What are some of the ways to collect cards ? There are several different ways to collect cards. For example, you can try to collect all the cards in a given set. Or you can focus on cards of your favorite team or even just your favorite player.

Some people only collect Rookie cards while others only collect cards of Hall-of-Famers. Because of the high cost of vintage sports cards today a growingly popular way to collect sportscards is "Type Collecting".

"Type Collecting" is collecting just one of each "type" (or different issue) made. To keep costs down, on some of the scarcer more expensive issues you can simply add a less expensive "common" to your collection. While on more common or recent issues you can select your favorite player or a card from your favorite team.

No matter how you collect - the key is to have fun !

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The issue below is featured elsewhere on this website:

1952 Wheaties Champions

In 1952 Wheaties issued this set of cards on the back of their boxes. The 2" x 2-3/4" cards needed to be hand cut from the back of the boxes making high quality samples almost impossible to find. The set featured 30 different champions from a variety of sports in both "Portrait" and "In-Action" poses for a total of 60 different cards. 10 of the 30 athletes are baseball players with football, basketball, golf, bowling, diving and other sports also included.

Top players in the set are Ted Williams, Stan Musial, George Mikan, Ben Hogan and Otto Graham.


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The issue below is featured elsewhere on this website:

1961 Topps Baseball Cards AUTOGRAPHED Set info/information

By now you all heard of the rash of counterfeit autographs on the market.
The following autographs all come with auction house LOA's (Letters of Authenticity) from the top authenticators in the hobby - PSA/DNA or James Spence !!!

The 1961 Topps baseball card set included 587 standard size 2" x 3" cards (#1-#598 with several skipped numbers). 2 cards were accidently numbered #463, one of them (the Braves Team card was supposed to be card #426).
The 1961 Topps set included the following special "subsets":
* League Leaders (10 cards)
* World Series highlights (10 cards)
* Highlights (11 cards)
* MVP's (16 cards)
* Checklists (7 cards plus several variations)
* Team cards (xx cards)
* Special Multi-Player cards (xx cards)
* Managers (xx cards)
* Topps Rookie All-Star Trophies (xx cards)
* Sporting News All-Stars (#566-#589)

1961 Topps was the first of the very popular and continuing Topps Rookie All-Star Trophies subsets. Cards from the last series (#523-#589) are scarce "High Numbers" making the set fairly expensive to complete.

MLB Baseball expansion led to one of the least attractive aspects of the 1961 Topps baseball card set. The American League made several changes. The Los Angeles Angels were added, the Washington Senators became the Minnesota Twins and a new franchise was granted to the Washington Senators who also debuted in 1961. Possibly because of these team changes, many players had their portrait photos taken without their baseball caps. Not only did most of the players look awful without their caps, they looked more like your old, not so handsome uncle then athletes!

Card backs were black print on an army green background on a dark card stock making them somewhat difficult to read. TOP ROOKIES: #35 Ron Santo, #141 Billy Williams, #417 Juan Marichal, Willie Davis, Zoilo Versalles & Jim Maloney; are popular players but still reasonably priced.

More interesting tid-bits from the 1961 Topps set:

Card #1 features All-American basketball player Dick Groat
Card #2 features Roger Maris, right prior to his record breaking 61 Home Run season
........Maris once ran back four kickoffs for touchdowns in a single game!
Mickey Mantle had 6 cards making the 1961 Topps set that much more costly.
  #.44 American League Home Run Leaders
  #300 Mickey Mantle's regular card
  #307 Mickey Mantle 'Slams 2 Home Runs' World Series
  #406 Mickey Mantle "Blasts 565 ft. HR"
  #475 Mickey Mantle MVP card
  #578 Mickey Mantle's scarce high # All-Star card
Other than the checklists, the set has no other variations.

Collectors of 1961 Topps cards may also want to take a look at 3 other baseball issues Topps released that year: a Topps Dice Game, Topps Magic Rub-Offs and a series of Topps Stamps.

Although some dealers and collectors consider this set boring, with it's clean design, many special subsets and multiple cards of some of the games top stars including 6 Mantle's I rate it much higher.
And, as I end most of my write-ups on vintage Topps sets, grab a glance at Don Mossi and those famous ears !

Click for complete 1961 Topps Autographed baseball cards Checklist and Prices
Note: You may be on that page right now.


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The issue below is featured elsewhere on this website:

1974 Topps DECKLE EDGE

This 72-card test issue set was released with a very limited distribution only the East Coast around Massachusetts making them quite scarce. They were officially simply called "Topps Baseball Photos" but their serrated or "DECKLED" edge gave them the name they go by today. The 2 7/8" x 5" inch cards were sold in either a 2 card pack with gum or a 3 card pack with no gum for 5 cents.
Click to enlarge Complete Proof Sheet on left
The fronts look similar to the black and white Exhibit Postcards from the 50's and 60's featuring a photo with a facsimile blue autograph. The backs make this very scarce test issue even more interesting ! They feature handwritten script of the player's name, team, position & date and location of the photograph as well as a mock newspaper article on the player's career.

This was Topps 2nd "Deckle Edge" issue, their first being the smaller and much more common 1969 Topps Deckle Edge which were inserts in certain 1969 Topps packs.

Variations of 1974 Topps Deckle Edge do exist, making this issue even more fun and challenging to collect. The backs can be found in either gray or a much scarcer white version. Also, a more limited proof version with non-scalloped edges exists and can be found with and without card numbers.

Click for complete 1969 Topps Deckle Edge checklist and prices

Click for complete 1974 Topps Deckle Edge checklist and prices
Note: You may be on that page right now.


Baseball
The issue below is featured elsewhere on this website:

BOXING CARDS

One of the most popular of all boxing collectibles is the boxing card. Just like baseball cards, boxing cards have been produced in this country since the 1880's. First they appeared in tobacco products, then, later in gum and candy. Unlike baseball cards, however, boxing cards have also been produced in countries around the world. Unfortunately, there's no price guide. Card collectors either collect complete sets, all the cards of one fighter, one of each type of card (type collectors) or collect cards of just certain eras. Some collectors do all of these and their collections can be quite extensive. Because rarity means so much in card collecting, several unusual situations exist. In 1910 the Mecca and Hassan tobacco companies put out a couple of colorful boxing sets that include such names as Jack Johnson and Jim Jeffries in one set and John L. Sullivan and Jim Corbett in the other. While these are great names and beautiful cards, they are also not very rare. The companies made a large quantity of them. At from $5-30 a piece, they do not compare at all favorably with prices of baseball cards of the day. Much rarer and more valuable are two cards made some 40 years later. In 1951 Topps gum company made a large card set called "Ringside" and in that set, for some unknown reason, #49 light heavyweight Bob Murphy is hard to find and in mint condition may fetch as much as $200. No other card in that set is worth as much (though Marciano is close - not rarer, but it IS Marciano). Even rarer is a card made in 1948. For years collectors thought that the Leaf gum company's "Knockout" set consisted of 49 cards, erratically numbered. Indeed, uncut sheets of the cards could be found that were exactly 7 cards by 7 cards. Then, about 8 years ago, a Rocky Graziano Leaf emerged and since then one other has been found. The Graziano card may not have been released except by accident or may have been recalled. The last Graziano Leaf sold at auction for over $1,000. One owner of the card says he got his in a trade with a neighborhood friend in New York City in 1949 so they must have been available. The next most expensive card in the set is the Joe Louis at about $75 in mint condition. In cards, condition is very important and a card rated as only "fair" may sell for only 10% of what a "mint" one will sell for. "Mint cards" must have a new sheen, very sharp corners and no blemishes or creases. Very minor imperfections lower this to "Excellent" and what you and I might consider a card in "great shape" could be graded at only "Good" or, at best, "Very Good." The most challenging cards to collect are the pre-1900 cards. This is an expensive hobby for advanced collectors. Research is absolutely necessary to assemble a good 19th century collection. Beginners can come into card collecting with the new stuff. In the early '90's, several sets were released that are very good. These are inexpensive and are a great way for card collectors to get a start. They can be found for sale by dealers in major sports collectors' publications and at sport card shows. The four most popular sets are Ringlords, AW, Brown's and Kayo. Pictured is a rare Red Cross tobacco card of Sullivan and Corbett circa 1895. For a bonus image of all the pre-1900 John L. Sullivan tobacco cards we know of. Click here.

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