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1929 'Wer nennt die Lander' GREECE Flag cards - SET (Series 26-10 cards) n card

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From Germany, EX/MINT to NM/MINT !
1929 'Wer nennt die Lander' GREECE Flag cards - SET (Series 26-10 cards) n cards value
         

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Below are some tidbits on baseball and sportscard collecting. Visit our web site for more info on vintage baseball, football, basketball, hockey, sports and non-sport cards and card collecting.
Baseball
Q8: What are some additional useful to know baseball card collecting terms ?

(part 4)
Team Set - a group of cards featuring all the issues of the players of a particular team from the same release.

Test Issue - a preliminary offering issued as a test to see if a product would be accepted by collectors.

Tobacco Card - typically from the early 1900s, these were cards issued with tobacco products. The most famous of which is the "T-206" Honus Wagner card.

Traded/Update Set - a set issued after the original issue primarily featuring rookies or players who were traded since the original issue came out.

Trimmed Card - a card reduced in size from when it was issued, usually to hide an imperfection such as damaged edges or corners. Trimmed cards usually have very little value but in some cases such as the 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle, even trimmed cards can go for thousands of dollars. The most famous 'trimmed' card to date is the T206 Honus Wagner purchased by Wayne Gretzky. The card was actually too large and was trimmed down to it's proper size.

Unauthorized Issue - a card release which is not licensed by a league, a player’s association, or by a player.

Variation - a card that was printed by the manufacturer in two or more different ways.

Wax - a universal collecting term for factory-sealed packs or boxes. The term "wax" most often refers to sealed material that was originally released in the early 1990’s or back -- a time when packs were wrapped and sealed in wax paper wrappers. It can casually reference modern era packs or boxes that no longer use actual wax paper.

Baseball
The vintage issue below featured elsewhere on this website:

1961 Topps Baseball Cards Set checklist/info/information

The 1961 Topps baseball card set included 587 standard size 2½" x 3½" cards (#1-#598 with several skipped numbers). 2 cards were accidently numbered #463, one of them (the Braves Team card was supposed to be card #426).
The 1961 Topps set included the following special "subsets":
* League Leaders (10 cards)
* World Series highlights (10 cards)
* Highlights (11 cards)
* MVP's (16 cards)
* Checklists (7 cards plus several variations)
* Team cards (xx cards)
* Special Multi-Player cards (xx cards)
* Managers (xx cards)
* Topps Rookie All-Star Trophies (xx cards)
* Sporting News All-Stars (#566-#589)

1961 Topps was the first of the very popular and continuing Topps Rookie All-Star Trophies subsets. Cards from the last series (#523-#589) are scarce "High Numbers" making the set fairly expensive to complete.

MLB Baseball expansion led to one of the least attractive aspects of the 1961 Topps baseball card set. The American League made several changes. The Los Angeles Angels were added, the Washington Senators became the Minnesota Twins and a new franchise was granted to the Washington Senators who also debuted in 1961. Possibly because of these team changes, many players had their portrait photos taken without their baseball caps. Not only did most of the players look awful without their caps, they looked more like your old, not so handsome uncle then athletes!

Card backs were black print on an army green background on a dark card stock making them somewhat difficult to read. TOP ROOKIES: #35 Ron Santo, #141 Billy Williams, #417 Juan Marichal, Willie Davis, Zoilo Versalles & Jim Maloney; are popular players but still reasonably priced.

More interesting tid-bits from the 1961 Topps set:

Card #1 features All-American basketball player Dick Groat
Card #2 features Roger Maris, right prior to his record breaking 61 Home Run season
........Maris once ran back four kickoffs for touchdowns in a single game!
Mickey Mantle had 6 cards making the 1961 Topps set that much more costly.
  #.44 American League Home Run Leaders
  #300 Mickey Mantle's regular card
  #307 Mickey Mantle 'Slams 2 Home Runs' World Series
  #406 Mickey Mantle "Blasts 565 ft. HR"
  #475 Mickey Mantle MVP card
  #578 Mickey Mantle's scarce high # All-Star card
Other than the checklists, the set has no other variations.

Collectors of 1961 Topps cards may also want to take a look at 3 other baseball issues Topps released that year: a Topps Dice Game, Topps Magic Rub-Offs and a series of Topps Stamps.

Although some dealers and collectors consider this set boring, with it's clean design, many special subsets and multiple cards of some of the games top stars including 6 Mantle's I rate it much higher.
And, as I end most of my write-ups on vintage Topps sets, grab a glance at Don Mossi and those famous ears !

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Baseball
The vintage issue below featured elsewhere on this website:

1954 Quaker Oats Sports Oddities
Checklist & Values


1954 Quaker Oats Sports Oddities Complete Set (27). When originally issued, cards appeared in boxes of Quaker Oats "Puffed Wheat and Rice" or youngsters could buy a complete 27-card through the mail. This pack which does offer a complete set of cards seems to have never witnessed public distribution. Highlights of this set are: #'s 7 Stagg, 10 Blackhawks, 19 Halas, 23 Harlem Globe Trotters, 25 Texas/Northwestern, 26 Nagurski and 27 Yankees Stadium. Grades EX/MT NM with a couple slightly Inserted into boxes of Quaker Puffed Rice Cereal were 2-1/4”x 3-1/2” cards with rounded corners that commemorated strange moments in sports history. The 27-card set features one portrait and one action illustration of the athlete and “oddity.” This multi-sport set was also offered as a complete set for fifteen cents and two box tops from Quaker Puffed Wheat or Quaker Rice. ix-plus decades of seasoning. An eye-catching design. A strong variety of featured athletes and feats. How about a charming quirkiness? Not to mention a relatively affordable price tag. 54QuakerHalasA sports card issue with at least one of those elements is bound to attract its lot of collectors. Few sets, however, include all of those pieces, but the 1954 Quaker Oats Sports Oddities offering does blend them together and the collection certainly has its fans. With the No. 8 Current Finest ranking on the PSA Set Registry for the issue, Pete Lee is a big fan of the smaller grouping that collectors first found tucked in boxes as a bonus for consumers of Puffed Wheat and Puffed Rice cereal. Lee collects both sport and non-sport sets and he enjoys the 1954 Quaker Oats issue’s 54QuakerOatsunopenedcellopacknumber1onfronthand-painted images, its non-sport look and vibe and that it shows “a more personal side to sports than just the stats,” he said. “I like the oddities, I like Ripley’s Believe it or Not type things. That’s what this set is about for me. It’s about the oddball side of sports.” Oh, is it ever. The issue starts by highlighting Big Ten halfback Johnny Miller, who, in a high school game, was about to punt a football when a defensive lineman burst through the line attempting to block the kick. Miller faked the punt for a split second and that move made the defender jump in spread eagle fashion. “Miller then stepped back and coolly kicked the ball between the legs of his astonished foe. The kick went sixty yards,” the summary said. As the text on every one of the 27 cards in the set ends: “It’s Odd but True!” It’s unclear who did the artwork for these rounded cornered collectibles, but sports columnist Jimmy Evans apparently penned all the card back write ups. The cards tend to spotlight mostly unfamiliar names and events at this point, and maybe they were not well known at the time, either, but a few still register a blip or more in sports fans’ hearts and minds. Even so, the stories are the stars of the set, which was the goal. First buying Quaker Oats cards raw about five years ago and then turning to eBay to purchase graded examples, Lee has a few favorites in the set that mix the “for sure” with the obscure. 54QuakerNagurski front“I like the Bronko Nagurski card (No. 26),” he said of the football Hall of Famer who is described on his pasteboard as the “toughest football player of them all” and how in one pro game he “knocked out three men on three consecutive plays!” “I also really like The Harlem Globetotters card (No. 23) because I used to see the Globetrotters as a boy,” the Northern California-based hobbyist noted. Another top choice is Carl Stockholm (No. 17). “It talks about how Stockholm was wounded in World War I and then became a great bicycle racer,” Lee said. “I liked his ability to overcome adversity.” Girl power 54QuakerRosenbomAlthough it might fall way short of overcoming adversity, but challenging nonetheless, Lee said cards of Joyce Rosenbom (No. 20), a hard-throwing baseball and softball player, as well as the set-ender of Yankee Stadium, noting how no one has hit a baseball out of the ballpark, were two of the toughest cards for him to find in the issue. In addition to Rosenbom, three other women have their own card in the set, perhaps the strangest story coming via Catherine Fellmeth (No. 8). While bowling in a tournament, and trying to pick up a spare with three pins left, Fellmeth rolled her ball down the alley, got the spare, but one of her pins flew into an adjoining alley and knocked down the two pins the other bowler was looking to get a spare with. The ’54 Sports Oddities cards show up at modest levels on eBay, both raw and graded. When it comes to PSA Population numbers, all of the issue’s cards have at least 50 to 60 samples on average, with usually double digits for all in the high-grade range (PSA 9 or 10). The cards of Nagurski and George Halas (No. 19), another NFL legend, show up the most, with 75-80 examples of each; the slots filled by the four ladies, meantime, are on the lowest end of the availability scale, but not scarce. Refreshingly wallet-friendly 54QuakerYankeeStadiumPrices on higher condition Sports Oddities generally fall in the more affordable range compared to the era’s regular issue cards. With a little patience, raw commons can be found for just a few dollars each, while graded cards are more hit or miss in the bargain department. That said, a handful of various PSA 10s recently sold in the $40 to $50 apiece area, including a Halas for $44. Lee said the popularity of the ’54 Quaker Oats offering remains limited, in part, due to its low hobby profile. The collector added that since the set embraces more of a non-sport mentality it will never generate the interest, on average, as a more mainstream issue. Yet, down the road a decade or more, Lee sees the set’s “fringe popularity” continuing to resonate with a certain type of collector, one “who likes both sports and non-sports issues and can appreciate the crossover.”
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Baseball
The vintage issue below featured elsewhere on this website:

1970/1972/1973 Topps Candy Lids

1973 Topps Candy Lids Box 1973 Topps Candy Lids Tub
Thru the years, Topps has tried some crazy products, often called "test issues". Test issues were usually only distributed in limited areas and were somewhat difficult to find. One of Topps most unusual were the 1970 and 1973 Topps Candy Lids; little tubs of candy with player's photos on the bottom of their 1 7/8" lids. The unnumbered lids were issued in 10 cent containers, 24 to a box. Sealed tubs can still be found with asking prices in the $150 to $200 range. Called "Baseball Stars Bubble Gum", the 1970 Topps Candy Lids set had 24 different players, the 1973 Topps Candy Lids set had 55.

1970 Topps Candy Lids Front 1970 Topps Candy Lids Back 1972 Topps Candy Lids Ryan Topps released their first Candy Lids in 1970. The 1970 Topps Candy Lids are very, very hard to find. The 1970 lids had small photos of Tom Seaver, Carl Yastrzemski and Frank Howard on the top.

They returned in 1973 with some minor changes. The candy was replaced by gum, the mini photo of Frank Howard was gone from the top of the lid and team logos were airburshed off the player's caps. Even the tiny Yaz and Seaver photos had their logos removed. 1973 Topps Candy Lids are hard to find, but not nearly as scarce as the 1970's. There was also a 1972 Topps Candy Lids issue in the works but it was never released although a very few proofs do exist.

1973 Topps Comics Topps released two other test issue sets in 1973 (1973 Topps Pinups and 1973 Topps Comics), each with very limited distribution. The 1973 Topps Comics and 1973 Topps Candy Lids shared many of the same photos. Just like the candy lids, those sets had no team logos. If you're thinking "licensing dispute", you are likely right. Topps received player's union's permission for these test issues, but not Major League Baseball's permission. Apparently issues over rights and fees with Major League Baseball Properties and the player's union resulted in Topps shutting down future production of test issues, supplemental sets and insert sets, putting an end to some of their most "fun" collectibles.

Due to licensing issues, after 1973 Topps released very few "oddball" issues. In 1975 did release a "Minis" set but they reportedly cut production on the regular set to produce the minis, so the players and owners probably got nothing extra. Topps next major test issue was the 1977 Topps Cloth Stickers. Afterwards Topps started producing sets for other distributors like Burger King, Zest Soap and others having the distributors cut the licensing deals, saving them the aggravation.

Click for complete 1973 Topps Candy Lids Checklist and Prices
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