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1956 Topps FB #CA CONTEST CARD (Sunday Nov. 25th)


Book   = $ *BOOK*
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Bears vs NY Giants / Rams vs Colts.
1956 Topps FB  #CA CONTEST CARD (Sunday Nov. 25th) Football cards value
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1959 Topps    displays vintage 1959 Topps Football sports cards.
Bowman Mickey Mantle     displays all Bowman Mickey Mantle sports cards.
Below are short bits & pieces on sportscard & baseball trading card collecting.
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Baseball

1970/1972/1973 Topps Candy Lids
Checklist & Values


1973 Topps Candy Lids Box 1973 Topps Candy Lids Tub Topps has tried many crazy products, called "test issues". Mostly distributed in limited areas, test issues were scarce. "Candy Lids" were little tubs of candy with player's photos on bottom of a 1-7/8" lid. 10 cents/tub, 24 tubs/box.

Topps first Candy Lids in 1970 and they are very, very hard to find. They had small photos of Tom Seaver, Carl Yastrzemski & Frank Howard.

1970 Topps Candy Lids Front 1970 Topps Candy Lids Back 1972 Topps Candy Lids Ryan 1970 Topps Candy Lids were called "Baseball Stars Bubble Gum", had 24 players, the 1973 Topps Candy Lids had 55.

Topps planned 1972 Candy Lids but never released it, a few proofs do exist.

1973 Topps Comics Topps 1973 Pinups & Comics share many of the same photos.

Click for complete 1973 Topps Candy Lids Checklist/Prices
Note: You may be on that page now.
Baseball

1958 Hires Root Beer

Hires Root Beer issued this 66 card set back in 1958. The cards came with an attached advertising tab. Cards with their tab intact are extremely difficult to find and thus are quite expensive. The actual card size varies from 2-3/8 in. to 2-5/8 in. wide and 3-3/8 in. to 3-5/8 in. high without the tab. Cards are numbered from #10 thru #76 with #69 not issued.

The card design - a wood grain "knot hole" through which the player is viewed - is a collector's favorite and was brought back by Bowman for their 2003 Bowman Heritage product. Although small at only 66 cards, the set did contain it's share of cards of Hall-of-Famers and Superstars such as Willie Mays, Hank Aaron, Pee Wee Reese, Don Drysdale, Richie Ashburn, Bill Mazeroski, Duke Snider, Larry Doby, Don Newcombe and others...


Baseball

Auction Regulating Agencies


Today, most auction websites, companies, auction houses and auctioneers are very reliable.
... but ...
In case you have a problem with your auction website, company, auction house, or auctioneer, there are agencies out there that can help you.

• National Auctioneers Association   ( web: auctioneers.org )
• Better Business Bureau   ( web: bbb.org )
• Some states have auctioneer's licensing boards
   ...check your state's website (examples: ca.gov utah.cov )

My auctions offer not just baseball but also football, basketball, non-sports & comics.
Baseball
Tobacco Cards

Starting approximately in 1886, sportscards, mostly baseball cards, were often included with tobacco products, for promotional purposes and also because the card reinforced the packaging and protected cigarettes from damage. These sports cards are referred to as tobacco cards in the baseball card hobby. Over the next few years many different companies produced baseball cards. Tobacco cards soon started to disappear as the American Tobacco Company tried to develop a monopoly by buying out other companies.

They were reintroduced in the 1900s, as American Tobacco came under pressure from antitrust action and Turkish competition. The most famous and most expensive, baseball card is the rare T206 Honus Wagner. The card exists in very limited quantities compared to others of its type because Wagner forced the card to be removed from printing. It is widely (and incorrectly) believed that Wagner did so because he refused to promote tobacco, but the true explanation lies in a dispute over compensation.

Soon other companies also began producing baseball and football cards. Sports magazines such as The Sporting News were early entries to the market. Candy manufacturers soon joined the fray and reflected a shift toward a younger target audience for cards. Caramel companies were particularly active and baseball cards were one of the first prizes to be included in Cracker Jacks. World War I soon suppressed baseball card production.

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