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1960 Armour COIN - Frank Malzone MEDIUM-BLUE (Red Sox)


Price = $ 19.95
NEAR MINT to NM/MINT

1960 Armour COIN - Frank Malzone MEDIUM-BLUE (Red Sox) Baseball cards value
         

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Below are tidbits on sportscard & baseball bubble gum trading card collecting.
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Baseball

1974 Topps DECKLE EDGE
Checklist & Values


This scarce 72-card test issue set was released with very limited East Coast distribution making them quite scarce. Officially simply called "Topps Baseball Photos", their serrated or "DECKLED" edge gave them the name they go by today. The 2 7/8" x 5" inch cards were sold in 2 card packs with gum or 3 card packs without for 5 cents.
Click to enlarge Complete Proof Sheet on left
Fronts are similar to b&w Exhibit Postcards from the 50's with photos and facsimile autographs. The backs make this very scarce test issue more interesting ! They feature handwritten script of player's name, team, position & date and location of the photograph as well as a mock newspaper article.

This was Topps 2nd "Deckle Edge" issue, their first being the smaller and more common 1969 Topps Deckle Edge inserts in 1969 Topps packs.

Variations of 1974 Topps Deckle Edge exist, making this issue more fun and challenging to collect. Backs can be found in gray or a much scarcer white. Also, more limited proof versions with non-scalloped edges exist and can be found with and without card numbers.

Click for complete 1969 Topps Deckle Edge checklist and prices

Click for complete 1974 Topps Deckle Edge checklist and prices
Note: You may be on that page right now.

Baseball

1971 Kellogg's

1971, Kellogg's second and by far scarcest and most valuable set, contained 75 different players on 2 by 3 cards. The cards were plastic coated giving them a 3-D look !!! The plastic coating also made high grade cards nearly impossible find. Over time and the elements, most cards would curl making light and heavy cracks very common.

As opposed to Kellogg's other issues which were available from the company as complete sets, 1971 Kellogg's cards were ONLY available one in each specially marked box of Kellogg's cereal. The only way to complete your 1971 Kellogg's set was to pester mom to buy, buy, buy more boxes of cereal.

In addition to the 75 different players, numerous scarcer variations exist with minor differences in the stats on back. In addition, all 75 cards and some variations are found with 2 different forms of copyright on the back:
  XOGRAPH ( 80 total cards)
  @1970 XOGRAPH (121 total cards)
The numbers above may not be 100% accurate.

The "toughest" cards appear to be: # 7 Alou (1970 Oakland NL) # 28 Wright (Angles Crest Logo) # 54 Johnson (Angles Crest Logo) # 64 Fregosi (Angles Crest Logo) # 70 Osteen (No Number on back) # 2 Seaver (ERA 2.81) # 41 Gaston (113 Runs) # 65 Rose (RBI 485)


Baseball

Ways to sell your baseball cards


2 reasons auctions are popular way to sell vintage sports cards.
#1 Desirable items tend to get top dollar (or better !)
#2 Everything goes
... This can be good - Everything gone, happy with final total
... or can be very bad - Everything gone, but at super low prices

OTHER WAYS TO SELL YOUR CARDS
eBay Buy-it-Now card store swap meet Craigslist garage/yard sale
or DONATE to a charity for tax write-off
Not selling but perhaps easiest with possible $$$ return.
ASSUMPTIONS:
#1) You are one of the RARE tax payers left in America
#2) You have mostly late 80's & 90's "junk"
Consider donating the "junk" and keep better stuff to sell later. Tax deduction was based on LESSER of "what-it-cost" & "What-it's-Worth". For "What-it's-Worth", I use Beckett which can be higher than what you paid. Check with your tax guy.

Cut/Paste TurboTax discussion link below:
https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/3372284-are-trading-card-donations-deductible-if-so-how-much Possible Charities for Donations
•Goodwill   •Salvation Army   •Cerebal Palsy   •Children's Hospitals   •Cubs scout troops
...or an online charity
  •Cards 2 Kids   •Commons4Kids.org   •CollectiblesWithCauses.org
Verify all "charities " before donating.

If buying, for great prices check my weekly Vintage Sportscard Auction
Baseball
Baseball card collecting terms (part C)

Cabinet Card Were oversized trading cards featuring paintings issued mostly 1910-1915.

Card Show is a gathering of dealers & collectors looking to buy/sell/trade sports cards and memorabilia.

Card Stock is the material a card is printed on. Usually paper-based, today companies play with the card stock and sometimes it appears to be wood or leather or see-thru acrylic ...

Cello Pack is a card pack whose wrapper is see-thru plastic. Usually the top & bottom cards are seen. Unopened cello packs showing major stars and rookies sell for heavy premiums.

Centering is the balance of the borders: top/bottom & left/right. On perfectly-centered cards, top/bottom borders match as do the left/right borders. Centering is presented as a set of numbers & directions and often included with the grade. Perfectly-centered is "50/50 t/b" AND "50/50 l/r". As centering gets worse, one number increases and the other decreases. For example: 90/10 t/b is considered extremely off-center top to bottom. The numbers add up to 100 (50/50, 60/40, 90/10 ...).

Certificate Of Authenticity (COA) A document used to verify legitimacy of a collectible. NOTE: Keep in mind that COA's are easier to fake then autographs.

Common A card of a non-star player is considered a "Common" as opposed to cards of a star players or specialty/subset cards such as league leaders, teams cards, World Series cards...

Condition (Grade) Centering, corner wear, photo clarity, edges, creases, print flaws ... all combine to determine a card's condition or grade. Along with rarity/scarcity it is the major factor in a card's value.

Crease Defect usually caused by bending the card. Hard to see, or not, a crease lowers the card's grade (VG or lower) and greatly diminishes it's value.

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