FREE Free Baseball Cards (10) NM/MINT
Vintage Hall-of-Famers
click for details
Free Baseball Cards FREE

USE BACK ARROW TO RETURN TO PRIOR PAGE

1952 Topps # 61 'Tookie' Gilbert BLACK-BACK (NY Giants)


Book   = $ *BOOK*
Price = $ 0
VG/EX

1952 Topps # 61 'Tookie' Gilbert BLACK-BACK (NY Giants) Baseball cards value
Price = $ 0
Sorry but this item is not available at this time.

Search for another sportscard using the search box below
or click on banner at top to visit our Baseball Cards store.

pointer Vintage Baseball cards
Select a different Sport or Vintage Baseball Cards set

or Find:
Enter words, partial words or phrases
1959 Topps    displays vintage 1959 Topps Baseball sports cards.
Bowman Mickey Mantle     displays all Bowman Mickey Mantle sports cards.
Below are short bits & pieces on sportscard & baseball trading card collecting.
Please wander around the website for more info, prices, values & images
on vintage baseball, football, basketball, hockey, sport and non-sports cards.
Baseball

1971 Kellogg's

1971, Kellogg's second and by far scarcest and most valuable set, contained 75 different players on 2 by 3 cards. The cards were plastic coated giving them a 3-D look !!! The plastic coating also made high grade cards nearly impossible find. Over time and the elements, most cards would curl making light and heavy cracks very common.

As opposed to Kellogg's other issues which were available from the company as complete sets, 1971 Kellogg's cards were ONLY available one in each specially marked box of Kellogg's cereal. The only way to complete your 1971 Kellogg's set was to pester mom to buy, buy, buy more boxes of cereal.

In addition to the 75 different players, numerous scarcer variations exist with minor differences in the stats on back. In addition, all 75 cards and some variations are found with 2 different forms of copyright on the back:
  XOGRAPH ( 80 total cards)
  @1970 XOGRAPH (121 total cards)
The numbers above may not be 100% accurate.

The "toughest" cards appear to be: # 7 Alou (1970 Oakland NL) # 28 Wright (Angles Crest Logo) # 54 Johnson (Angles Crest Logo) # 64 Fregosi (Angles Crest Logo) # 70 Osteen (No Number on back) # 2 Seaver (ERA 2.81) # 41 Gaston (113 Runs) # 65 Rose (RBI 485)


Baseball

1968 Topps Action All-Star Stickers
Checklist & Values


1968 was an awesome year for Topps test & oddball issues with Game cards, Player Posters, 3-D cards, Plaks, Discs, Punchouts and these "Baseball Action Stickers" also called "Action All-Stars Stickers".

"Baseball Action Stickers" were STAR-PACKED 3-panel sticker strips, some with facsimile autographs. There were (16) different strips in the set but only 12 are totally different. #13 thru #16 re-used panels from #1 thru #12.

Strips were perforated, folded at joints and put in packs. Boxes had 12 packs (10 cents each) with 1 sticker per pack. Sets could be made back then for $1.60. Today, the Mantle panel goes for around $2,000.

Collectors often collect just individual panels as complete strips are so scarce, fragile & EXPENSIVE. Single panels themselves are quite scarce - in 20+ years PSA has graded just over 200 TOTAL compared to over 1,000 1952 Mantles !!!

PROOF sheet below is missing the facsimile autographs.

Click for complete 1968 Topps Action All-Star Stickers Info, Checklist & Prices

Another interesting issue: 1960 Pirates Tag-Ons Baseball Stickers

Baseball

1952,1953,1954,1955 Red Man TOBACCO
Checklist & Values


Tobacco cards were instrumental in the start of the baseball card industry but were pretty much unheard of since 1920. That is until RED MAN TOBACCO got in the game issuing baseball cards in 1952, 1953, 1954 & 1955.

For just 20 cents you got a pouch of Red Man tobacco and one awesome 3-1/2 x 4 inch baseball card with it's tab (3-1/2 x 3-5/8 without). Exchange FIFTY tabs and you got one free big league style felt baseball cap of your favorite team. This made cards with tabs much, much harder to find and values 2 to 10 times higher.

25 players from each league were selected by "Sporting News" editor J.G. Taylor Spink. A Player's artwork with different backgrounds was used year after year. If a player changed teams, new team name & logo were painted over the old one. To determine the year, just subtract 1 from the expiration date on back of the card. The 1954 set had four variations.

Click for complete 1952,1953,1954,1955 Red Man Tobacco cards checklist & prices
Note: You may be on that page.
Baseball
Baseball card collecting terms (part C)

Cabinet Card Were oversized trading cards featuring paintings issued mostly 1910-1915.

Card Show is a gathering of dealers & collectors looking to buy/sell/trade sports cards and memorabilia.

Card Stock is the material a card is printed on. Usually paper-based, today companies play with the card stock and sometimes it appears to be wood or leather or see-thru acrylic ...

Cello Pack is a card pack whose wrapper is see-thru plastic. Usually the top & bottom cards are seen. Unopened cello packs showing major stars and rookies sell for heavy premiums.

Centering is the balance of the borders: top/bottom & left/right. On perfectly-centered cards, top/bottom borders match as do the left/right borders. Centering is presented as a set of numbers & directions and often included with the grade. Perfectly-centered is "50/50 t/b" AND "50/50 l/r". As centering gets worse, one number increases and the other decreases. For example: 90/10 t/b is considered extremely off-center top to bottom. The numbers add up to 100 (50/50, 60/40, 90/10 ...).

Certificate Of Authenticity (COA) A document used to verify legitimacy of a collectible. NOTE: Keep in mind that COA's are easier to fake then autographs.

Common A card of a non-star player is considered a "Common" as opposed to cards of a star players or specialty/subset cards such as league leaders, teams cards, World Series cards...

Condition (Grade) Centering, corner wear, photo clarity, edges, creases, print flaws ... all combine to determine a card's condition or grade. Along with rarity/scarcity it is the major factor in a card's value.

Crease Defect usually caused by bending the card. Hard to see, or not, a crease lowers the card's grade (VG or lower) and greatly diminishes it's value.

© 1995-2019 "InterNet's Baseball Card Store" / Joseph Juhasz ... All Rights Reserved