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EXPOS (25) - 1975 Topps COMPLETE TEAM SET Baseball card

Price = $ 14.95
Mostly EX/MT-Nr MINT

 EXPOS (25) - 1975 Topps COMPLETE TEAM SET Baseball cards value
         

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Below are some tidbits on baseball and sportscard collecting. Visit our web site for more info on vintage baseball, football, basketball, hockey, sports and non-sport cards and card collecting.
Baseball
Q1: How long have sports cards been around ?

(part 1)
The first baseball trading cards date back to 1869. For many years, baseball cards were packaged in packs of tobacco as a way to increase sales the same way that today prizes are packaged in boxes of cereal. In the 1920's and 1930's, candy and gum companies started packaging baseball cards in their products as well.

Baseball card production was virtually halted in the early 1940's due to paper shortages created by World War II. The "Modern Era" of baseball cards began in 1948 when Bowman Gum Inc. offered one card and one piece of gum in a pack for a penny.

The first important football set was the Mayo set featuring college players in 1984. Other than the 1935 National Chicle set no other key football set was issued until 1948 when noth Bowman and Leaf produced sets.

Baseball
The vintage issue below featured elsewhere on this website:

HARTLAND STATUES

Hartland produced it's first baseball statues back in the early 60's. Sports Collectibles Digest stated that the 1960's Mickey Mantle Hartland is the single most popular plastic sports statue ever produced ! In 1988 Hartland created their 25th Anniversary Editions which, except for some very minor details, were identical to the original.

Hartland partnered with America's leading hobby-periodical publisher, Krause Publications, to create the SCD Authentic series offering the original 18 as you've never seen them with each statue dramatically different from prior releases. They are amazingly beautiful and exquisitely detailed in their road uniforms with painted pinstripes and wood grained bats making them a unique collectible opportunity for both veteran collectors and Hartland newcomers alike.

Limited to only 2,500 pieces each, these statues are BRAND NEW, MINT and in THEIR ORIGINAL BOXES !!!

Click for complete Hartland Baseball Statues & Figurines checklist and prices
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Baseball
The vintage issue below featured elsewhere on this website:

1969 Topps Stamps

Following stints as inserts in 1961 and 1962, stamps finally arrived with their own issue in 1969 ! A nickel for a 12-stamp strip plus a mini album !!!

The 1969 Topps Stamps set contained (240) 1x1-7/16 inch unnumbered stamps with player's photo and name,team & position inside a colored banner. The stamps were released in both horizontal (2 rows of 6) & vertical (2 columns of 6). 1969 Topps Stamps are often confused with Topps' 1974 issue. The 1974 Stamps have ovals rather than banners at bottom and came only in horizontal 12-stamp panels.

To store the stamps, Topps issued a set of 24 mini albums, one for each team. The booklets were the same size as a baseball card and held a complete 10-stamp team set. More fun for kids, the back cover had facsimile autographs of all the players in the team set. The design is nearly identical to the Topps 1969 football 4-in-1 stamp booklets.

The 1969 Topps Stamps set is packed with stars like Pete Rose and tons of Hall-of-Famers including MICKEY MANTLE, Willie Mays, Roberto Clemente & many more !!!

Click for complete 1969 Topps Baseball Stamps checklist and prices
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Baseball
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Vintage Baseball Card Auction terminology

Register: You give us your name, address and email so we can contact you after the auction with your winning bids.
2 Types of Bidding: There are 2 ways to bid in the auction.
/ auction bids - you simply click on YES button to make the next bid.
auction bids - you enter the MAXIMUM you would bid on this item. If you are outbid in the auction, the auction software will make the next bid as long as it is less than or equal to the auction MAXBID you enter.
Minimum or Starting bid: On expensive auction items, there is no point in auction bids starting at .25 and going up by .25 taking perhaps 100 such bids to reach even 10% of value. Thus some items in auctions have a "Minimum" or "Starting Bid".
Reserve bid: "Reserve" auction bids come into play once an auction is over. If the final "Hammer" price is less than the "Reserve" bid then there is no sale. I do not find this type of auction bidding very bidder friendly.

Click for more info on my Weekly Vintage BASEBALL CARD AUCTIONS

Baseball
The vintage issue below featured elsewhere on this website:

BOXING CARDS

One of the most popular of all boxing collectibles is the boxing card. Just like baseball cards, boxing cards have been produced in this country since the 1880's. First they appeared in tobacco products, then, later in gum and candy. Unlike baseball cards, however, boxing cards have also been produced in countries around the world. Unfortunately, there's no price guide. Card collectors either collect complete sets, all the cards of one fighter, one of each type of card (type collectors) or collect cards of just certain eras. Some collectors do all of these and their collections can be quite extensive. Because rarity means so much in card collecting, several unusual situations exist. In 1910 the Mecca and Hassan tobacco companies put out a couple of colorful boxing sets that include such names as Jack Johnson and Jim Jeffries in one set and John L. Sullivan and Jim Corbett in the other. While these are great names and beautiful cards, they are also not very rare. The companies made a large quantity of them. At from $5-30 a piece, they do not compare at all favorably with prices of baseball cards of the day. Much rarer and more valuable are two cards made some 40 years later. In 1951 Topps gum company made a large card set called "Ringside" and in that set, for some unknown reason, #49 light heavyweight Bob Murphy is hard to find and in mint condition may fetch as much as $200. No other card in that set is worth as much (though Marciano is close - not rarer, but it IS Marciano). Even rarer is a card made in 1948. For years collectors thought that the Leaf gum company's "Knockout" set consisted of 49 cards, erratically numbered. Indeed, uncut sheets of the cards could be found that were exactly 7 cards by 7 cards. Then, about 8 years ago, a Rocky Graziano Leaf emerged and since then one other has been found. The Graziano card may not have been released except by accident or may have been recalled. The last Graziano Leaf sold at auction for over $1,000. One owner of the card says he got his in a trade with a neighborhood friend in New York City in 1949 so they must have been available. The next most expensive card in the set is the Joe Louis at about $75 in mint condition. In cards, condition is very important and a card rated as only "fair" may sell for only 10% of what a "mint" one will sell for. "Mint cards" must have a new sheen, very sharp corners and no blemishes or creases. Very minor imperfections lower this to "Excellent" and what you and I might consider a card in "great shape" could be graded at only "Good" or, at best, "Very Good." The most challenging cards to collect are the pre-1900 cards. This is an expensive hobby for advanced collectors. Research is absolutely necessary to assemble a good 19th century collection. Beginners can come into card collecting with the new stuff. In the early '90's, several sets were released that are very good. These are inexpensive and are a great way for card collectors to get a start. They can be found for sale by dealers in major sports collectors' publications and at sport card shows. The four most popular sets are Ringlords, AW, Brown's and Kayo. Pictured is a rare Red Cross tobacco card of Sullivan and Corbett circa 1895. For a bonus image of all the pre-1900 John L. Sullivan tobacco cards we know of. Click here.

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