Click to return to

Baseball-Cards.com

Sportscards auctions with old non-sport and supplies
USE BACK ARROW TO RETURN TO PRIOR PAGE
IF WE DON'T HAVE THE CARDS YOU NEED - Check with the dealers below

Kurt Warner - 2000 Crown Royale #86 'PREMIERE DATE' Baseball card

Price = $ 12.50
NM/MINT

Serially #d & LIMITED TO ONLY 145 MADE !!!

Kurt Warner - 2000 Crown Royale #86 'PREMIERE DATE' Baseball cards value
         

Vintage Baseball cards
Select a different Sport or Vintage Baseball Cards set
      or SEARCH for:  
  Enter words,partial words,partial words with wildcards (*) or a phrase in quotes.
  1959 Topps Yankees     displays vintage 1959 Topps Yankees cards.
  Bowman Mantle     displays all Bowman Mickey Mantle cards, old and recent.

My favorites: 1964 Topps Stand-ups, 1955 Topps DoubleHeaders.
Always buying vintage sports cards and non-sports cards.

Below are some tidbits on baseball and sportscard collecting. Visit our web site for more info on vintage and current baseball, football, basketball, hockey, sports and non-sport cards and card collecting.
Baseball
Q5: What are some useful to know baseball card collecting terms ?

(part 1)
Certificate Of Authenticity - a document that is used to verify the legitimacy of a collectible. In reality, it is worthless, unless it shares a counterfeit- proof serially-numbered hologram that is attached to the item, and the certificate bears the signature of a notary public, or written verification by the manufacturer.

Common - any card which is not short-printed, an insert, a bonus card, or has an insertion ratio. In short, the cards that comprise the manufacturer’s basic set.

Condition - the physical appearance of a card/collectible. Centering, corner wear, photo clarity, edges, the presence of foreign material, signs of misuse are the critical components. Along with rarity/scarcity, it is a major factor in determining the value of a card or collectible.

Crease - an obvious paper wrinkle defect usually caused by bending the card [i.e.- the result of being tortured on a rear-wheel bicycle spoke during the early ‘50s and ‘60s].

Die-Cut - an insert/parallel card that differs from the basic card by a process of the manufacturer "cutting" portions of the card revealing a special design. Recent issues may also be individually and serially-numbered.

Baseball
The issue below is featured elsewhere on this website:

1956 Topps Baseball Cards

1956 Topps Wax Box 1956 Topps Wax Pack I have a fondness for the 1956 Topps issue. When I first started collecting back in 1964, my friends and I would wander nearby neighborhoods in search of "old cards". Back then, the oldest cards we ever found in dealing with other kids were 1957 Topps.

Eventually I saw my first 1956 Topps card - I was hooked. It was larger, on a thicker, fluffier card stock making it look much, much older compared to 1957 than just 1 year. We thought they looked "ancient" !!!

I changed neighborhoods in 1966 leaving my childhood friends behind. Before I left, I gave away all my cards except for a small cigar box full of my favorites - and I stopped collecting. I had a great 3 year run but I sure wish I would have been collecting in 1966 and 1967 with those tough high numbers. I would have loved to have had a cigar box full of them in place of my hoard of 1964 Topps Felix Mantilla and Gary Peters cards.

The regular 1956 Topps baseball card set is one of my favorites. Topps again went with a slightly larger (3-3/4" by 2 5/8") horizontal card design, similar to their 1955 Topps cards. Several of the portraits are even the same used on 1955 Topps cards some even back to 1954 Topps.

1956 Topps was the first issue to feature team cards and checklists. In addition Topps also included cards of the 2 league presidents, William Harridge and Warren Giles.

With Bowman now gone, Topps could again make cards of Mickey Mantle who was missing from Topps issues since 1953. Once you get past Mickey Mantle, this is a fun and relatively simple set to complete as there are no high numbers or extremely expensive rookie cards with Hall-of-Famer Luis Aparicio being the top rookie.

The set contains over 200 variations making things quite interesting for master set collectors. Most variations deal with the card stock (gray and white card back variations).
Cards #1-100 gray backs are scarcer with a slight premium
Cards #101-180 white backs are much scarcer with a larger premium
... rumor has it gray outnumbers white about 9-to-1 in the above run.

There are also several cards that have color line variations on the card front. Most notably is the Ted Williams card which has either no line over his name or a thin green, red, blue, or yellow line between the white border for a total of five variations. Whitey Ford and Early Wynn also have no line or a thin red or yellow line. In addition, many team cards had 3 different variations with the team name either on the Left, Centered or Right.

1956 Topps Hank Aaron 1956 Topps Mickey Mantle
The only errors in the set are a handful of uncorrected errors the most famous of which is card #31 of Hank Aaron which actually pictures Willie Mays sliding into home. Card #135 Mickey Mantle is also an interesting card. The card pictures Mantle leaping high into the stands trying to catch a home run ball. The artist did a great job and Mantle makes the catch !!! An awesome play to put on this great card - right ? Only problem is that on the real play, Mantle missed the ball. 1956 Topps Mickey Mantle Catch
And as always for vintage Topps sets, take a quick look at Don Mossi and his famous ears !

Collectors of 1956 Topps should also take a look at their side issue '1956 Topps Pins'. In addition to their 1956 Topps baseball card set, Topps released their 1956 Topps Pins set using the same portrait photos as the cards. In the end, collectors of the day preferred cards to pins and Topps cut back the 1956 Topps Pin set from a planned 90 pins to just 60.
Click for complete 1956 Topps PINS Checklist and Prices

Click for complete 1956 Topps baseball cards Checklist and Prices
    Note: You may be on that page right now.


Baseball
The issue below is featured elsewhere on this website:

1968 Topps Action All-Star Stickers
Baseball Cards Set checklist/info

Another one of my favorite Topps test issues !!!   In 1968, trying to catch the fancy of young collectors, Topps produced a set of "Baseball Action Stickers", often called "Action All-Stars Stickers". It was a big year for Topps test/oddball issues. Topps 1968 offerings also included Game cards, Player Posters, 3-D cards, Plaks, Discs and Punchouts.

The Topps 1968 "Baseball Action Stickers" set consists of 16 numbered 3-part vertical sticker panel strips containing individually removable, die-cut stickers; loaded with stars like Mantle, Mays, Aaron, Clemente, Seaver (2nd year), Yastrzemski ... While there are (16) different three-panel stickers in the set, only 12 contain totally different panels. Stickers #13 thru #16 mix and matched previously used panels making 36 different panels, not 48.

Each strip (15 3/4" tall and 3 1/4" wide) was made up of three 3 1/4 x 5 1/4 inch panels, perforated at the joints for separation. Each three-panel strip featured a large image of a star player in the center panel, with smaller pictures of three players on the top and bottom panels. Facsimile autographs accompanied the large sticker and some, but not all of the smaller stickers. The manila-colored, peel-able back is blank-backed. The full strip was folded along the 2 perforations and inserted into it's pack.

Sold in 1-sticker packs in 1968 with 12 packs per box; at ten cents a pack, sets could be put together for just $1.60. Today, if you could find them, a mid four figures or more would be needed to build a set. Today a complete 3-panel sticker with Mantle in the center commands up to $2,000 alone.

Complete strips with the 3-panels still attached are so scarce and fragile AND EXPENSIVE that collectors usually collect individual panels and the grading companies including PSA grade the individual panels. The single panels themselves are quite scarce and in the 23 years PSA has been around they have graded just over 200 of them TOTAL. That's less than 9 per year !!! The pop report is on the average of only 4 to 5 of each individual panel !!! To put that into perspective, PSA has graded 1,132 1952 Topps Mickey Mantles !!! Collectors who understand the concept of supply and demand know how cool these are and if you pass them by, it might be awhile before they pass by again.

Proofs without the perforations have shown up over the years, usually from the Topps vault sale. Note - this proof sheet is missing the facsimile autographs.

Click for complete 1968 Topps Action All-Star Stickers baseball cards Checklist and Prices
Note: You may be on that page right now.
      Click here for a larger image of the above proof sheet

Baseball
The issue below is featured elsewhere on this website:

1970/1972/1973 Topps Candy Lids

1973 Topps Candy Lids Box 1973 Topps Candy Lids Tub
Thru the years, Topps has tried some crazy products, often called "test issues". Test issues were usually only distributed in limited areas and were somewhat difficult to find. One of Topps most unusual were the 1970 and 1973 Topps Candy Lids; little tubs of candy with player's photos on the bottom of their 1 7/8" lids. The unnumbered lids were issued in 10 cent containers, 24 to a box. Sealed tubs can still be found with asking prices in the $150 to $200 range. Called "Baseball Stars Bubble Gum", the 1970 Topps Candy Lids set had 24 different players, the 1973 Topps Candy Lids set had 55.

1970 Topps Candy Lids Front 1970 Topps Candy Lids Back 1972 Topps Candy Lids Ryan Topps released their first Candy Lids in 1970. The 1970 Topps Candy Lids are very, very hard to find. The 1970 lids had small photos of Tom Seaver, Carl Yastrzemski and Frank Howard on the top.

They returned in 1973 with some minor changes. The candy was replaced by gum, the mini photo of Frank Howard was gone from the top of the lid and team logos were airburshed off the player's caps. Even the tiny Yaz and Seaver photos had their logos removed. 1973 Topps Candy Lids are hard to find, but not nearly as scarce as the 1970's. There was also a 1972 Topps Candy Lids issue in the works but it was never released although a very few proofs do exist.

1973 Topps Comics Topps released two other test issue sets in 1973 (1973 Topps Pinups and 1973 Topps Comics), each with very limited distribution. The 1973 Topps Comics and 1973 Topps Candy Lids shared many of the same photos. Just like the candy lids, those sets had no team logos. If you're thinking "licensing dispute", you are likely right. Topps received player's union's permission for these test issues, but not Major League Baseball's permission. Apparently issues over rights and fees with Major League Baseball Properties and the player's union resulted in Topps shutting down future production of test issues, supplemental sets and insert sets, putting an end to some of their most "fun" collectibles.

Due to licensing issues, after 1973 Topps released very few "oddball" issues. In 1975 did release a "Minis" set but they reportedly cut production on the regular set to produce the minis, so the players and owners probably got nothing extra. Topps next major test issue was the 1977 Topps Cloth Stickers. Afterwards Topps started producing sets for other distributors like Burger King, Zest Soap and others having the distributors cut the licensing deals, saving them the aggravation.

Click for complete 1973 Topps Candy Lids Checklist and Prices
Note: You may be on that page right now.

Baseball
The issue below is featured elsewhere on this website:

1974 Topps & Parker Brothers Football

In 1974, along with cards in wax packs, Topps also issued the football cards used in Parker Brothers' "Pro Draft" board game. The (50) Parker Brothers cards are skip numbered from the 1st 132 Topps cards and are all offensive players, mostly from the skill positions.

Most Parker Brothers cards are similar to the ones from packs except on the back where most Parker Brothers cards had 1972 stats instead of 1973 and (2)* rather than (1)* in the copyright line. BUT NOTE: Some regular Topps cards have both * and **   ---   It's complicated! Six of the cards have totally different designs; three All-Pros and three with horizontal designs that were changed to vertical to match the rest of the cards.

Team checklist cards were randomly included in the Topps wax packs.
TOP ROOKIES: Joe DeLamielleure, Ray Guy, Bert Jones, Harold Carmichael, John Matuszak, Ahmad Rashad, Chuck Foreman, John Hannah and actor Ed Marinaro.

Click for complete 1974 Topps & Parker Brothers Football checklist and prices
Note: You may be on that page right now.

Click to visit a great blog on: 1974 Parker Brothers Football


Baseball

© 1995-2018 "InterNet's Baseball Card Store" / Joseph Juhasz ... All Rights Reserved