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Vintage Topps cards with Mickey Mantle
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1998 Absolute Checklists #12 Peyton Manning ROOKIE Baseball card

Price = $ 29.95
NM/MINT



1998 Absolute Checklists #12 Peyton Manning ROOKIE Baseball cards value
         

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Below are some tidbits on baseball and sportscard collecting. Visit our web site for more info on vintage and current baseball, football, basketball, hockey, sports and non-sport cards and card collecting.
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Q7: What are some additional useful to know baseball card collecting terms ?

(part 3)
High Numbers - vintage cards were issued in the ‘50s-‘70s in a series. During the baseball season, the largest number of cards were made. As the schedule progressed into September, when there would be less interest in baseball cards , Topps for one, specifically decreased production and hence much less product was available. As a result, a scarcity-factor was created and a premium holds for these first type of "short-printed" cards.

Inserts - special randomly-inserted cards which are not part of the regular set. Many modern inserts are sequentially-numbered and rarer than the card sets into which they are inserted.

O-Pee-Chee / OPC - a subsidiary of Topps, this card issue was produced specifically for distribution in Canada.

Promotional Card - generally referred to as cards issued to show what the product will look like on release and intended to help spur future sales. Often called a "promo" card.

Reprint - cards issued to reproduce the originals. With the current trend of vintage reprints, the new versions have a distinguishing characteristic evidenced by numbering.

Restored - a card or piece of memorabilia which someone has tried to return to a "like-new" condition. A restored card is considered to be of very little value.

Rookie Card - any league-licensed, widely distributed card to feature a player in his first year of trading cards.

Series - a group of cards within an issue deliberately split up by the manufacturer to distribute at different times of the year. (i.e.- vintage 1st series cards 1-100 were released in April and 2nd series cards 101-200 were released in July, etc.).

Short Print (SP) - a card printed to a lesser quantity than other cards in a set. Many recent short prints are also individually & serially-numbered.

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1958 Hires Root Beer

Hires Root Beer issued this 66 card set back in 1958. The cards came with an attached advertising tab. Cards with their tab intact are extremely difficult to find and thus are quite expensive. The actual card size varies from 2-3/8 in. to 2-5/8 in. wide and 3-3/8 in. to 3-5/8 in. high without the tab. Cards are numbered from #10 thru #76 with #69 not issued.

The card design - a wood grain "knot hole" through which the player is viewed - is a collector's favorite and was brought back by Bowman for their 2003 Bowman Heritage product. Although small at only 66 cards, the set did contain it's share of cards of Hall-of-Famers and Superstars such as Willie Mays, Hank Aaron, Pee Wee Reese, Don Drysdale, Richie Ashburn, Bill Mazeroski, Duke Snider, Larry Doby, Don Newcombe and others...


Baseball
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1969 Topps Stamps

Following stints as inserts in 1961 and 1962, stamps finally arrived with their own issue in 1969 ! A nickel for a 12-stamp strip plus a mini album !!!

The 1969 Topps Stamps set contained (240) 1x1-7/16 inch unnumbered stamps with player's photo and name,team & position inside a colored banner. The stamps were released in both horizontal (2 rows of 6) & vertical (2 columns of 6). 1969 Topps Stamps are often confused with Topps' 1974 issue. The 1974 Stamps have ovals rather than banners at bottom and came only in horizontal 12-stamp panels.

To store the stamps, Topps issued a set of 24 mini albums, one for each team. The booklets were the same size as a baseball card and held a complete 10-stamp team set. More fun for kids, the back cover had facsimile autographs of all the players in the team set. The design is nearly identical to the Topps 1969 football 4-in-1 stamp booklets.

The 1969 Topps Stamps set is packed with stars like Pete Rose and tons of Hall-of-Famers including MICKEY MANTLE, Willie Mays, Roberto Clemente & many more !!!

Click for complete 1969 Topps Baseball Stamps checklist and prices
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Baseball
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1971 O-Pee-Chee Baseball

Also referred to as OPC or Topps Canada, most vintage OPC sets were near replicas of the Topps cards from that year. Exactly same in design they usually only differed with the addition of French to the backs and some fronts.
To the benefit of collector's OPC made several changes in their 1971 set. The most obvious and useful was a complete redesign of the card backs and the addition of another player photo ! Additionly, over 20 cards were changed including the inclusion of what could be considered the first "Traded" cards. Another difference: Topps cards #202 and #289 were changed to allow the addition of 2 more Expos to the set.
The 1971 OPC set is legendary for its short print run, estimated at perhaps just 5% of Topps’ Production. This issue is considered quite elusive, even in Canada.
TOP ROOKIE: Steve Garvey
TOP STARS: Nolan Ryan, Roberto Clemente, Willie Mays, Hank Aaron, Ernie Banks, Pete Rose, Ted Williams, Thurman Munson, Reggie Jackson, Don Baylor/Dusty Baker RC & MORE !!!

Click for complete 1971 OPC/O-Pee-Chee Baseball checklist and prices
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Baseball
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BOXING CARDS

One of the most popular of all boxing collectibles is the boxing card. Just like baseball cards, boxing cards have been produced in this country since the 1880's. First they appeared in tobacco products, then, later in gum and candy. Unlike baseball cards, however, boxing cards have also been produced in countries around the world. Unfortunately, there's no price guide. Card collectors either collect complete sets, all the cards of one fighter, one of each type of card (type collectors) or collect cards of just certain eras. Some collectors do all of these and their collections can be quite extensive. Because rarity means so much in card collecting, several unusual situations exist. In 1910 the Mecca and Hassan tobacco companies put out a couple of colorful boxing sets that include such names as Jack Johnson and Jim Jeffries in one set and John L. Sullivan and Jim Corbett in the other. While these are great names and beautiful cards, they are also not very rare. The companies made a large quantity of them. At from $5-30 a piece, they do not compare at all favorably with prices of baseball cards of the day. Much rarer and more valuable are two cards made some 40 years later. In 1951 Topps gum company made a large card set called "Ringside" and in that set, for some unknown reason, #49 light heavyweight Bob Murphy is hard to find and in mint condition may fetch as much as $200. No other card in that set is worth as much (though Marciano is close - not rarer, but it IS Marciano). Even rarer is a card made in 1948. For years collectors thought that the Leaf gum company's "Knockout" set consisted of 49 cards, erratically numbered. Indeed, uncut sheets of the cards could be found that were exactly 7 cards by 7 cards. Then, about 8 years ago, a Rocky Graziano Leaf emerged and since then one other has been found. The Graziano card may not have been released except by accident or may have been recalled. The last Graziano Leaf sold at auction for over $1,000. One owner of the card says he got his in a trade with a neighborhood friend in New York City in 1949 so they must have been available. The next most expensive card in the set is the Joe Louis at about $75 in mint condition. In cards, condition is very important and a card rated as only "fair" may sell for only 10% of what a "mint" one will sell for. "Mint cards" must have a new sheen, very sharp corners and no blemishes or creases. Very minor imperfections lower this to "Excellent" and what you and I might consider a card in "great shape" could be graded at only "Good" or, at best, "Very Good." The most challenging cards to collect are the pre-1900 cards. This is an expensive hobby for advanced collectors. Research is absolutely necessary to assemble a good 19th century collection. Beginners can come into card collecting with the new stuff. In the early '90's, several sets were released that are very good. These are inexpensive and are a great way for card collectors to get a start. They can be found for sale by dealers in major sports collectors' publications and at sport card shows. The four most popular sets are Ringlords, AW, Brown's and Kayo. Pictured is a rare Red Cross tobacco card of Sullivan and Corbett circa 1895. For a bonus image of all the pre-1900 John L. Sullivan tobacco cards we know of. Click here.

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