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1962 Topps #387 Lou Brock ROOKIE [#a] (Cubs) Baseball card

Price = $ 99.95
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1962 Topps #387 Lou Brock ROOKIE [#a] (Cubs) Baseball cards value
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Below are some tidbits on baseball and sportscard collecting. Visit our web site for more info on vintage baseball, football, basketball, hockey, sports and non-sport cards and card collecting.
Baseball
Q5: What are some useful to know baseball card collecting terms ?

(part 1)
Certificate Of Authenticity - a document that is used to verify the legitimacy of a collectible. In reality, it is worthless, unless it shares a counterfeit- proof serially-numbered hologram that is attached to the item, and the certificate bears the signature of a notary public, or written verification by the manufacturer.

Common - any card which is not short-printed, an insert, a bonus card, or has an insertion ratio. In short, the cards that comprise the manufacturer’s basic set.

Condition - the physical appearance of a card/collectible. Centering, corner wear, photo clarity, edges, the presence of foreign material, signs of misuse are the critical components. Along with rarity/scarcity, it is a major factor in determining the value of a card or collectible.

Crease - an obvious paper wrinkle defect usually caused by bending the card [i.e.- the result of being tortured on a rear-wheel bicycle spoke during the early ‘50s and ‘60s].

Die-Cut - an insert/parallel card that differs from the basic card by a process of the manufacturer "cutting" portions of the card revealing a special design. Recent issues may also be individually and serially-numbered.

Baseball
The vintage issue below featured elsewhere on this website:

1969 CITGO Coins

1969 Citgo Coin banner
In 1969, to commemorate Baseball's 100th Anniversary, CITGO released their "Famous Baseball Player Coin Collection" of 20 brass coated metal coins. On the front, the coins featured the player's name and a raised image of his head. The back displayed a banner honoring baseball's s 100th Anniversary. The coins are approx. 1" in diameter and are very susceptible to tarnishing due to oxidation.

Customers received a single coin in it's sealed pack free with a fill-up and could pay 25 cents for additional coins. The 20 coin set could be inserted into a cardboard backing for display. On the back of the display was a short bio with stats of each player. Click to view an image of the cardboard backing and some more sample coins:

1969 Citgo Coin front Pictured is an unopened pack containing one coin.

Click for complete 1969 CITGO Coins Checklist and Prices
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Baseball
The vintage issue below featured elsewhere on this website:

1971 Kellogg's

1971, Kellogg's second and by far scarcest and most valuable set, contained 75 different players on 2 ¼” by 3 ½” cards. The cards were plastic coated giving them a 3-D look !!! The plastic coating also made high grade cards nearly impossible find. Over time and the elements, most cards would curl making light and heavy cracks very common.

As opposed to Kellogg's other issues which were available from the company as complete sets, 1971 Kellogg's cards were ONLY available one in each specially marked box of Kellogg's cereal. The only way to complete your 1971 Kellogg's set was to pester mom to buy, buy, buy more boxes of cereal.

In addition to the 75 different players, numerous scarcer variations exist with minor differences in the stats on back. In addition, all 75 cards and some variations are found with 2 different forms of copyright on the back:
  XOGRAPH ( 80 total cards)
  @1970 XOGRAPH (121 total cards)
The numbers above may not be 100% accurate.

The "toughest" cards appear to be: # 7 Alou (1970 Oakland NL) # 28 Wright (Angles Crest Logo) # 54 Johnson (Angles Crest Logo) # 64 Fregosi (Angles Crest Logo) # 70 Osteen (No Number on back) # 2 Seaver (ERA 2.81) # 41 Gaston (113 Runs) # 65 Rose (RBI 485)


Baseball
The vintage issue below featured elsewhere on this website:

1952 Topps Baseball Cards
Checklist & Values


1952 is often thought of as Topps 1st baseball card set, but it was not.
Topps issued the following baseball card sets prior to their huge 1952 set:
• 1948 Topps Magic Photos
• 1951 Topps Red Backs
• 1951 Topps Blue Backs
• 1951 Topps Connie Mack's All-Stars
• 1951 Topps Major League All-Stars

The 1951 Red & Blue Back issues (52 cards each) were similar to a deck of cards and could be used to play a baseball card game. The sets left out all the game's stars and were not fan favorites keeping Bowman far ahead in the baseball card market.

In response, Topps issued their "BIGGER is BETTER" 1952 Topps set they described as: "GIANT IN BOTH SIZE and NUMBER of CARDS" (407).

Series one cards (#1-80) can be found with black or red backs. The key card in the 1952 Topps set is card #311 MICKEY MANTLE. It is often called Mickey Mantle's Rookie card but it is not. The honor goes to his 1951 Bowman card. The 1952 Topps set also featured my favorite and THE greatest player of all-time, WILLIE MAYS !!! Again, this is sometimes called Willie Mays' Rookie card but it is not. That honor also goes to his 1951 Bowman card. Another 1952 Topps card of note is card #1 Andy Pafko. Pafko, a fine player, is basically just a "Common card" and should be worth no more than any other "Common" in the 1952 Topps set - But SURPRIZE !!! It's worth TONS more because it's card #1 and absorbed much more damage than most cards from rubber bands and other damage, thus high grade cards are very, very tough to find accounting for the super high values.
BUT --- That should not account for the super high asking prices on lower grade copies. THose prices do not make sense (supply and demand).

The 6th (last) series, starts with #311 Mickey Mantle and ends with #407 Braves Hall-of-Famer Eddie Mathews. These "High Numbers" are significantly scarcer and can almost be called rare. In addition to Mickey Mantle, other star High Numbers included #312 Jackie Robinson and #314 Roy Campanella.

The most common explanation for their scarcity is as follows.
This HUGE set was released in series weeks apart. When it came to the last series the baseball season was winding down and football was starting. Most candy store owners had boxes of baseball cards leftover from earlier in the year so most eliminated their orders for the 6th series of 1952 Topps thus creating the scarcity.

To add interest to the story, it is often said that the unsold 6th series cards (including THOUSANDS of 1952 Topps MICKEY MANTLEs !!!) were disposed of by Topps, dumped offshore into the Atlantic Ocean like most of New York's trash in those days.

Click for complete 1952 Topps Baseball card checklist, values and prices.
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