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1966 Topps #126 Jim Palmer ROOKIE AUTOGRAPHED (Orioles) Baseball card

Price = $ 125
NEAR MINT to NM/MINT
The unautographed card lists for $100. Card comes with color photo LOA from Premier Auctions AZ.
1966 Topps #126 Jim Palmer ROOKIE AUTOGRAPHED (Orioles) Baseball cards value
         

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Below are some tidbits on baseball and sportscard collecting. Visit our web site for more info on vintage baseball, football, basketball, hockey, sports and non-sport cards and card collecting.
Baseball
Q3: Are sports cards valuable ?

Like all collectibles, some sports cards increase in value and a few can become very valuable. Determining a card's value is based on a number of factors including the popularity of the player, the card's scarcity, it's condition, and demand among collectors. A card can be scarce but if there's no demand for it, it's value may not be to great.

Q: What are some of the ways to collect cards ? There are several different ways to collect cards. For example, you can try to collect all the cards in a given set. Or you can focus on cards of your favorite team or even just your favorite player.

Some people only collect Rookie cards while others only collect cards of Hall-of-Famers. Because of the high cost of vintage sports cards today a growingly popular way to collect sportscards is "Type Collecting".

"Type Collecting" is collecting just one of each "type" (or different issue) made. To keep costs down, on some of the scarcer more expensive issues you can simply add a less expensive "common" to your collection. While on more common or recent issues you can select your favorite player or a card from your favorite team.

No matter how you collect - the key is to have fun !

Baseball
The vintage issue below featured elsewhere on this website:

1970/1972/1973 Topps Candy Lids

1973 Topps Candy Lids Box 1973 Topps Candy Lids Tub
Thru the years, Topps has tried some crazy products, often called "test issues". Test issues were usually only distributed in limited areas and were somewhat difficult to find. One of Topps most unusual were the 1970 and 1973 Topps Candy Lids; little tubs of candy with player's photos on the bottom of their 1 7/8" lids. The unnumbered lids were issued in 10 cent containers, 24 to a box. Sealed tubs can still be found with asking prices in the $150 to $200 range. Called "Baseball Stars Bubble Gum", the 1970 Topps Candy Lids set had 24 different players, the 1973 Topps Candy Lids set had 55.

1970 Topps Candy Lids Front 1970 Topps Candy Lids Back 1972 Topps Candy Lids Ryan Topps released their first Candy Lids in 1970. The 1970 Topps Candy Lids are very, very hard to find. The 1970 lids had small photos of Tom Seaver, Carl Yastrzemski and Frank Howard on the top.

They returned in 1973 with some minor changes. The candy was replaced by gum, the mini photo of Frank Howard was gone from the top of the lid and team logos were airburshed off the player's caps. Even the tiny Yaz and Seaver photos had their logos removed. 1973 Topps Candy Lids are hard to find, but not nearly as scarce as the 1970's. There was also a 1972 Topps Candy Lids issue in the works but it was never released although a very few proofs do exist.

1973 Topps Comics Topps released two other test issue sets in 1973 (1973 Topps Pinups and 1973 Topps Comics), each with very limited distribution. The 1973 Topps Comics and 1973 Topps Candy Lids shared many of the same photos. Just like the candy lids, those sets had no team logos. If you're thinking "licensing dispute", you are likely right. Topps received player's union's permission for these test issues, but not Major League Baseball's permission. Apparently issues over rights and fees with Major League Baseball Properties and the player's union resulted in Topps shutting down future production of test issues, supplemental sets and insert sets, putting an end to some of their most "fun" collectibles.

Due to licensing issues, after 1973 Topps released very few "oddball" issues. In 1975 did release a "Minis" set but they reportedly cut production on the regular set to produce the minis, so the players and owners probably got nothing extra. Topps next major test issue was the 1977 Topps Cloth Stickers. Afterwards Topps started producing sets for other distributors like Burger King, Zest Soap and others having the distributors cut the licensing deals, saving them the aggravation.

Click for complete 1973 Topps Candy Lids Checklist and Prices
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Baseball
The vintage issue below featured elsewhere on this website:

1959 Topps Baseball Cards
Checklist & Values


As with all the other baseball card sets Topps produced in the 1950's, there were several firsts, some finales, and some continuing touches added to the set composition. As the end of the 1950's approached, Topps had not only solidified their monopoly but also was continually making adjustments based on feedback received from the children of that era. One feedback which may or may not have been asked for was putting a very small photo in a circle in the center of the card. That circular photo made for the smallest photo used as the main pose in any of the Topps sets issued since 1952. In fact, the smaller photo must have been so popular that photos of that size as the main photo were never that small again on a Topps card. However, there were also many firsts involved with this set including what developed to be the mostly standard card production decrease from the earliest series through the final series - with the final series being significantly more difficult then the earliest series. Yes, while the first series is slightly more difficult then all the other series until the final series, the basic pattern of Topps production and release schedule was begun in 1959. In addition, the 1959 set again stretched what many of the kid collectors of the time believed the set composition size should be. Adding nearly 100 cards to the previous year's high, gave Topps baseball a total of 572, which was the biggest set produced in the 1950's. While there were some quirks along the way, once again the primary focus turned out to be on the players. However, for the first time since 1954, there would be no Ted Williams in the set. The kids who collected and were used to seeing a Ted Williams card among the first five cards were probably shocked to see a Ford Frick commissioner card leading off the set. However, that aberration was made up by having both Mickey Mantle and Willie Mays cards included in the first series to get the year off to a flying start. This would be the final time both Mantle and Mays would have their base card issued in the first series. The player selection again proved to be strong with the added fill-up of "prospect" cards added for the second series. Since hope always springs eternal for baseball fans, what better way for fans early in the card collecting year to see what the future would be but by including cards of the teams leading prospects in a grouping. This concept of "prospect" cards is something Topps continues to popularize to this day; however the key release for unproven players is now part of the Bowman line. The biggest names in that series were Bob Allison, Johnny Callison, Ron Fairly, and Deron Johnson. While all nine players with careers that lasted into the 1970's, none of these players ever developed into the stars the fans had hoped for. The key rookie cards in this set ended up being George "Sparky" Anderson and future Hall of Famer Bob Gibson, who is featured in the high numbered series. For many years back in the day, smart dealers purchased the "Sparky" Anderson rookie as a common by hoping other dealers did not know his real name. Something else that is interesting about Sparky is he holds the major league record for most games played in a season of any player who had only one season in the majors. Other rookie cards in the high-numbered series include stars as Norm Cash, Mike Cuellar and Jim Perry. All three of those players would continue to be stars into the 1970's, and all won major awards or major league leading titles during their career. The last series (507-572) not only is the most difficult series, but also features the all-star subset of many of the game's greats, including Hank Aaron, Mickey Mantle and Willie Mays. With the cards being standard-size and the borders being white, there is the opportunity to acquire cards in the highest of grades. In addition, there is a growing amount of cards in the mint 9 (sans qualifiers) or gem mint 10 grades. The card with the most graded in those very high conditions is that of Don Drysdale, card #387 - with more than 70 cards achieving these high grades, with less than 1,750 cards submitted. With the hobby discovering more and more high graded examples, this proves the old adage that a large number of unopened packs have been found recently and still exist, with most being in the mid-series - where you can find the Drysdale card. Many of the first series are especially difficult to find in strong shape. So, with the largest set of the 1950's Topps was positioning themselves for their 1960's set pattern which would continue through the early 1970's.
Click for complete 1959 Topps Baseball card checklist, values and prices.
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Baseball
The vintage issue below featured elsewhere on this website:

1967 Topps WHO AM I ?

It's easy to see why the 1967 Topps "Who Am I? set is a favorite of both sports and non- sport collectors. The set's 44 cards feature mostly important figures from world history but what makes this set even more popular was the inclusion of 4 of baseball's most popular players: Mickey Mantle, Babe Ruth, Sandy Koufax and Willie Mays (pictured above) !!!

The players picture on the front is covered with a scratch-off disguise with silly, exaggerated features like hair, moustaches, hats, noses... and a clue to help kids identify the famous person pictured. The backs contained additional clues and instructions to "Scratch off disguise on front to discover Who I Am. Use a coin or fingernail."

Cards with their scratch-off coating intact are worth many, many times cards with the coatings removed. For example, NM/MINT Mickey Mantle with the coating is in the $200-$400 range while a NM/MINT Mantle with the coating removed is closer to $50.

Cards came in wax packs with 24 packs per box and the set is packed with desirable cards: Shakespear, Abe Lincoln, George Washington, Einstein, Queen Elizabeth, Joan of Arc, Julius Caesar, Columbus and Jackie Kennedy to name just a few.
Click for complete 1967 Topps Who Am I? checklist and prices
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